[ALREADY DONE] different even and odd time divisions for the CV-clock

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masi
Posts: 16
Joined: 16 Apr 2022, 21:57

[ALREADY DONE] different even and odd time divisions for the CV-clock

Post by masi »

One pulse could run straight 32rds and the other 16th triplets.
With clock dividers in the rack and logic modules you can then do rhythms with triplets and hemiolas.

AFAIK the MIDI clock is built around mutliples of 12 to allow for quadruple and triple meters as 12 is divisible by 4 and 3. So technially it should be possible, rigth?

Masi
Last edited by masi on 18 Apr 2022, 17:09, edited 1 time in total.
Simon
Posts: 195
Joined: 09 Jan 2022, 22:08

Re: different even and odd time divisions for the CV-clock

Post by Simon »

Hi Masi :)

On the Midronome you can already adjust the CV clocks to be anything from 0 to 24ppq (potentially 48ppq as discussed in the other topic).

So one pulse with straight 32rds: set CV clock 1 to 8ppq
and other at 16th triplets: set CV clock 2 to 6ppq

See https://www.facebook.com/midronome/vide ... 2943228335 from 3:30
masi
Posts: 16
Joined: 16 Apr 2022, 21:57

Re: different even and odd time divisions for the CV-clock

Post by masi »

On a stroll today it came to my mind that it would work out like that.

So to spare me the maths (and confuse my old brain), the UI could name the musical terms along with the ppq :)

Masi
Simon
Posts: 195
Joined: 09 Jan 2022, 22:08

Re: [ALREADY DONE] different even and odd time divisions for the CV-clock

Post by Simon »

Ha ha well nice that you ask - let's see what would be easier to understand then :) Just remember all the device has is 3 digits.

The original design was showing 4 to 96 (4, 8, 12, 16, 24, 32, 48, 96), meaning 4th note, 8th note, 16th note, etc.
Problem was for 8th triplets it would show 12 for example - but that could easily be changed to something like 8t.
Then it could be: 4, 8, 8t, 16, 16t, 32, 32t, 64t

But I changed it to ppq because I heard people that use modular would be familiar with ppq - don't a lot of modules use ppq?
Also the list looks easier that way: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24.
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